Air Freight News

India to curb smart meter imports to boost domestic industry

India plans to discourage imports of smart meters as the country pushes for domestic manufacturing of the equipment and cut shipments from China.

Efforts to revive economic growth as well as fears of cybersecurity breaches have forced the country to take a raft of measures to curb imports. Soured relations with its northern neighbor China, for long a leading supplier of electrical equipment in the country, have bolstered such efforts.

“We’re going to put systems in place so that we only use made-in-India smart meters,” power minister Raj Kumar Singh said. “I really don’t want to buy anything from our northern neighbor. Plain and simple.”

The country will prepare a list of approved models and manufacturers who can sell in India, Singh said. The power ministry will hold consultations with manufacturers to prepare the list.

India sees pre-paid smart meters as a solution to reduce losses at power distribution utilities and it will need to install nearly 250 million meters for homes and commercial users, according to an estimate in 2020. The country’s money-losing power retailers aren’t paid for about a fifth of the electricity they supply because of theft and leakages through old cable networks.

Green Hydrogen

The minister also said the country will unveil its green hydrogen policy in about 10 days. The fuel—produced by splitting water with the help of clean electricity—is expected to play a crucial role in decarbonizing hard-to-abate industries such steel, refineries and fertilizers.

India plans to waive inter-state transmission charges for clean power used to make the fuel and provide land to set up renewable power facilities as well as bunkers for storing green hydrogen and green ammonia.

India aims to emerge as an export hub for the fuel and plans to allow dollar-denominated bids for setting up projects, Singh said, without elaborating.

Bloomberg
Bloomberg

{afn_job_title}

© Bloomberg
The author’s opinion are not necessarily the opinions of the American Journal of Transportation (AJOT).

Similar Stories

Deputy Secretary Graves to discuss Transatlantic trade with representatives in Europe

From May 31-June 3, 2022, Deputy Secretary of Commerce Don Graves will travel to The Hague, Netherlands, and Brussels, Belgium

View Article
Rice giant Thailand wants to coordinate price hikes with Vietnam

Thailand and Vietnam should jointly raise rice prices to boost their bargaining power in the global market, according to Thai premier Prayuth Chan-Ocha, a move that threatens higher food costs…

View Article
EIA analysis shows California drought will decrease hydropower, increase natural gas use and CO2 emissions

The extended drought in California could cut the state’s summer electricity generation from hydropower nearly in half compared with normal precipitation conditions, according to an analysis by the U.S. Energy…

View Article
https://www.ajot.com/images/uploads/article/1200x-1-52_1.jpg
Putin ties grain exports to demand that sanctions on Russia go
View Article
United States initiates second USMCA dispute on Canadian dairy tariff-rate quota policies

Yesterday, United States Trade Representative Katherine Tai announced that the United States is, for the second time, requesting dispute settlement consultations with Canada under the United States – Mexico –…

View Article
Cambodia hails US ties, seeks relief on China-linked sanctions

Cambodia said ties with the US had improved significantly and it expects the Biden administration to lift sanctions imposed over its relations with China “very soon,” a senior minister said…

View Article